Malachi Nichols

Malachi NicholsMalachi Nichols

212 Graduate Education Building
College of Education and Health Professions
Fayetteville, AR 72701
man002@uark.edu

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Malachi Nichols, originally from Midland, TX, is a Ph.D. candidate and a Research Assistant in the Department of Education Reform at the University of Arkansas. He graduated with a B.A. in African and African-American Studies and a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Arkansas in 2015. During his time as an undergraduate, he served in various positions, including a Robotics Teacher, Director's Assistant to an AmeriCorps Service Member at Prism Education Center in Fayetteville, AR., which fueled his interest and desire for education reform. His research interests include values-based education and non-cognitive skills.

Education:

  • University of Arkansas - B.A. in African and African-American Studies
  • University of Arkansas - B.S. in Mechanical Engineering 

Research Interests:

  • Values-based education
  • Non-cognitive skills

Peer Reviewed Publications:

  • Maranto, R., Trivitt, J., Nichols, M., & Watson, A. (forthcoming) "No Contractual Obligation to Improve Education: School Boards and their Superintendents." Politics & Policy.

Publications Under Review:

  • Nichols, M. (Under Review at The Journal of School Choice). "Can I Choose to Have Grit? Non-Cognitive Skills, Behavior and School Choice."

Working Papers:

  • Nichols, M., Zamarro, G., & Trivitt, J. (2017) "College Readiness and Student Success: The Role of Non-Cognitive Skills."
  •  Zamarro, G., Nichols, M., Duckworth, A., & D'Mello, S. (2017) "Further Validation of Survey-Effort Measures of Conscientiousness: Results from a Sample of High School Students."
  • Swanson, E., Watson, A., Ritter, G., and Nichols, M. (2016). "Promises Fulfilled? A Systematic Review of the Impacts of Promise Programs." EDRE Working Paper No. 2016-16.
  • Nichols, M., & Tuchman, S. (2016) "Does it Hurt to Go in or Does it Hurt to Go Out? Inclusion Effects on Student Discipline Infractions and Achievement within Special Education."